Tag Archives: Video

Lost in the Woods: Navigating the chronic Lyme debate

The medical establishment recognizes acute Lyme disease as a bacterial infection transmitted to humans by bites of the brown deer tick. Doctors treat it with a short-term course of antibiotics. They say chronic Lyme disease, meanwhile, doesn’t exist, and patients who say they have it are the victims of hype and hysteria.

The “Lyme-literate” community, on the other hand, says mainstream physicians have placed incomplete science ahead of patient health by not taking seriously the complaints of patients who say they have chronic Lyme and by opposing the massive doses of antibiotics that can keep symptoms in check.

It’s a complicated debate, charged politically, emotionally, financially and professionally, with some doctors putting their licenses and their livelihoods on the line to treat patients who they believe suffer from chronic Lyme.

In our video trailer, we lay out the complex framework for the story behind the chronic Lyme debate.

Entry Link: http://www.roanoke.com/lyme

lyme_video.pdf (318 KB)

This post was submitted by megmartin.

I-81: Fear, facts and the future

The highway that links Western Virginia evokes high emotions because of its heavy truck congestion. One in four vehicles is a big rig. In this special report, we examined the safety, impact and future prospects for I-81.

In reporting this series, we drew on tools that we hoped would convey the gravity of the problem, give it historical context and allow the public ample opportunity to comment and offer their ideas.

For our accident data mashup (image below, titled “Fatal crashes on I-81: 1998-2008” at http://roanoke.com/81), we began with 11 years’ worth of state accident data on I-81 in Virginia. We then merged that with a database we had created in-house by combing 10 years of newspaper accounts of accidents along the I-81corridor in Virginia. The final mashup allowed us to layer narrative detail on an otherwise dry official police account. The layering of the two databases allowed our audience to see how often trucks were involved in the 266 fatal crashes during that time. It’s easy to get lost in the details of individual crashes, with names and circumstances attached.

The other map on the homepage (http://www.roanoke.com/81), called “Highs and lows: Elevation and crash data,” allows users to see the road from a different angle than usual. Set against elevation data, the interactive graphic tracks crash data, injury stats, speed limits, and a handful of other factors that collectively make the road feel more treacherous than it might otherwise be.

Paired together with an overview video (http://www.roanoke.com/multimedia/81/xp-how_real_is_the_fear#video), photo galleries, a timeline of the road (on the sidebar of this page: http://www.roanoke.com/multimedia/81/xp-how_real_is_the_fear) and an ongoing discussion throughout the series, we hoped to tell a complete story of the subtleties and immense grey area that surround the very emotional topic of driving I-81 with the most appropriate tools available.

Entry Link: http://www.roanoke.com/81 (for additional links, see above)

i81_homepage.pdf (1007 KB)

This post was submitted by megmartin.

Legacy of the Flood: Remembering Roanoke’s flood of 1985

On Nov. 4 and 5, 1985, Southwest Virginia experienced the worst flooding it had ever known. It took the lives of ten people across the Roanoke Valley. For the survivors of those whose lives were lost in the Flood of 1985, the grief never recedes. And for all those who experienced it, the memories live on. Twenty-five years later, many shared their stories – some for the first time.

We looked back at the devastating flood: in pictures (then and now), in stories (for the first time, we profiled each of the victims of the flood), in newspaper front pages (pulled from our archives), and in stories submitted by readers across the region. We set up a Google Voice phone line for folks to call in. We asked them to mail us and e-mail us their letters and stories and photographs. And they did. It truly became the story of the valley’s devastation and recovery.

Entry Link: http://www.roanoke.com/flood

flood_homepage.pdf (893 KB)

This post was submitted by megmartin.

War in Afghanistan: Obama’s presidential order

An animated motion graphic detailing how President Obama decided which troops to send into combat.

Entry Link: http://www.usatoday.com/video/index.htm#/Iraq/War+in+Afghanistan%3A+Obama%27s+presidential+order/42804638001/43025166001/651073882001

This post was submitted by thargro.

Technology Gives Blind Students a Better View of Music

A new computer lab at the Berklee School of Music features software that allows visually impaired students to record music and transcribe it into a score that can be printed in traditional form, or scan sheet music and convert it to a Braille printout. Wayne Pearcey, a trumpeter from Texas, shares his experience in this video produced by Rose Engelland and Erik Jacobs.

This post was submitted by Ron Coddington.

Crisis Guide: Pakistan

Pakistan represents one of the world’s most troubling states in crisis. It is home to an array of terrorist groups that pose threats to international security and, increasingly, to Pakistan itself. It possesses a nuclear arsenal of about seventy to ninety weapons that is rapidly growing, and in the wake of growing instability, could become vulnerable to militants. Bordering a conflict-ridden Afghanistan and poised on a seemingly permanent war footing against India, what happens inside Pakistan’s borders matters deeply to the region and the wider world.

CFR’s “Crisis Guide: Pakistan” traces the evolution of Pakistan and the competing internal and external influences that have contributed to regular upheaval and stunted political and economic development. The Guide combines audio, video, and interactive features to break down the current state of affairs in Pakistan and provides historical context to better understand the root causes of the crisis.

Users participate in the interactive experience, navigating through six chapters of multimedia content: a video overview, a three-part timeline, an interactive catalogue of domestic issues, a map of Pakistan’s rough neighborhood, expert video analysis, and finally, a list of resources for further inquiry. Viewers decide for themselves how to interact with the content. Some may navigate linearly, while others may jump from chapter to chapter, only viewing the elements that are of interest to them.

Crisis Guide: Pakistan differs from traditional international coverage in that it is a piece of “living” content, regularly updated as developments occur, and is a distinctive Internet resource: intelligent yet accessible, deep yet interactive. The unique storytelling techniques used in this feature make it extremely accessible for such a complex subject. For these reasons, we at CFR.org believe Crisis Guide: Pakistan is worthy of a Best of Digital Design Award.

This post was submitted by Hagit Bachrach.

Crisis Guide: Pakistan

Pakistan represents one of the world’s most troubling states in crisis. It is home to an array of terrorist groups that pose threats to international security and, increasingly, to Pakistan itself. It possesses a nuclear arsenal of about seventy to ninety weapons that is rapidly growing, and in the wake of growing instability, could become vulnerable to militants. Bordering a conflict-ridden Afghanistan and poised on a seemingly permanent war footing against India, what happens inside Pakistan’s borders matters deeply to the region and the wider world.

CFR’s “Crisis Guide: Pakistan” traces the evolution of Pakistan and the competing internal and external influences that have contributed to regular upheaval and stunted political and economic development. The Guide combines audio, video, and interactive features to break down the current state of affairs in Pakistan and provides historical context to better understand the root causes of the crisis.

Users participate in the interactive experience, navigating through six chapters of multimedia content: a video overview, a three-part timeline, an interactive catalogue of domestic issues, a map of Pakistan’s rough neighborhood, expert video analysis, and finally, a list of resources for further inquiry. Viewers decide for themselves how to interact with the content. Some may navigate linearly, while others may jump from chapter to chapter, only viewing the elements that are of interest to them.

Crisis Guide: Pakistan differs from traditional international coverage in that it is a piece of “living” content, regularly updated as developments occur, and is a distinctive Internet resource: intelligent yet accessible, deep yet interactive. The unique storytelling techniques used in this feature make it extremely accessible for such a complex subject. For these reasons, we at CFR.org believe Crisis Guide: Pakistan is worthy of a Best of Digital Design Award.

This post was submitted by Hagit Bachrach.

Torn Apart

This is a story of a family of mixed legal status on their emotional journey through the U.S. immigration system. The family’s mother, Macrina Mota-Pineda, faces deportation because of her illegal immigration status, while she and her six U.S.-born children face emotional and financial hardship. The father was deported to Mexico in December 2008. After the loss of their father and his income, the family struggles to return to normalcy while fighting for their mother’s right to stay in the United States. This is especially difficult for the eldest teenage daughter, Yvette, who is afraid of losing her mother while trying to come to grips with the possibility that she will become responsible for her younger siblings’ welfare, derailing her own college and career aspirations.

Entry Link: http://www.mercurynews.com/torn-apart

This post was submitted by Dai Sugano.